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Add a little SALT to your Scarborough eating experience

Scarborough, A Little Taste (SALT) provides a quick reference to the many types of food served in this part of the city.

A few years ago, after a meeting about the Culinaria Research Centre, Gray Graffam, director of The Hub, realized he really didn’t know much about food in Scarborough.

“I researched some dishes, found one I might like to try, and looked at restaurants online to see where I could get it,” says Graffam. “Then I started to wonder if there was any way to make this process easier for people.”

And that was really the start of SALT (Scarborough, a Little Taste), a mobile app and website on food, specific cuisines and Scarborough restaurants to enjoy them. The app also offers recipes and links to YouTube videos about the dishes. Students at The Hub, an innovation and business incubator at UTSC, handled the front-end web design and also built a back-end content management system so that dishes, cuisines and restaurants can be added.

The cuisines and dishes were researched by teams of students, and their writing vetted by Historical and Cultural Studies Professor Daniel Bender before they went up on the site. “It’s truly wonderful when a good idea brings together exceptional talent, as it has done here with faculty, staff and students,” says Graffam. “Its presentation of Scarborough cuisine is, I hope, something that will be deemed worthy by those who have brought these cuisines to us – the chefs, owners and entrepreneurs of Scarborough's restaurants, and their patrons.”

The greatest thing about SALT? “It is real and it is genuine: every photograph on the site was taken in a restaurant, there’s no stock photography,” says Graffam.

 

What’s coming down the pipeline for SALT? “It will grow, we are planning to do so much more, there’s so much to discover,” says Graffam. For starters, that includes expanding the database, adding original video content, and possibly listing the stores and supermarkets selling specific ingredients for people to make the dishes at home.

 

 




© University of Toronto Scarborough