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WIDEN UTSC - on NOISE

 

WIDEN UTSC is back with a session on NOISE, Wednesday, March 13, 11am – 1pm in AA160, New Council Chamber (kindly RSVP to barry.freeman@utoronto.ca by Monday, March 11).

Three members of our UTSC community will speak about their research as it relates to noise:

MARLA HLADY  (Studio, Department of Arts, Culture and Media)
“Noise and Social Space”
The artist and writer Brandon LaBelle describes noise from the perspective of sound, as “the beginning of confrontation, of negotiation” and in the context of a socially defined space, an opportunity for a new sociality. Bodies in a space can complicate our understanding of both the space and the sound, where noise can become an opportunity for deeper listening to occur.

ANDREW MASON (Integrative Behavior and Neuroscience, Department of Biology)
“Animal Sounds - it's not noise, it's music”
If you manage to escape the incessant drone of traffic and ventilation, you may be reminded that humans are not the only noisy animals. Some of these natural sounds are more obviously melodious than others, but all are music to the right ears. This talk will sample the spectacular diversity of animal sound, with a focus on some unlikely singers and what we can learn from them (if we listen carefully).

LESLIE CHAN (International Development Studies)
“Impact Factor: Noise or signal?”
Impact factor is a measurement in academia of how often a particular journal is cited elsewhere, and is therefore used to indicate a journal’s success. But is the data on which this is based really an indication of meaningful use, or is ‘noise’ in the data being used as ‘signal’?

A light lunch will be provided.

 

About WIDEN UTSC

WIDEN UTSC is a discussion forum showcasing the exciting research happening at UTSC and mixing together different disciplinary perspectives on a common theme. The goal of this forum is to help remove the barriers between the disciplines and open up new collaboration and interaction possibilities.

Supported by the UTSC Office of Vice-Principal Research.




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