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The 35th Annual Watts Lecture presents Roméo Dallaire

Roméo Dallaire

A Story of Courage and Conviction

By taking a stand for the rights of those most vulnerable in times of conflict, Roméo Dallaire is considered a hero by the international community at large. Having faced both the trials of battle and the challenges of peacekeeping, he has returned home to boldly share his story, inspiring others to speak out about what they believe in. 

The 35th Watts Lecture

Lieutenant-General The Honourable Roméo Dallaire (Ret)

Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 5 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Academic Resource Centre Lecture Theatre, AC223

University of Toronto Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto 

To reserve your ticket for this free event, click here. For further information about this event contact: events@utsc.utoronto.ca

Lieutenant-General The Honourable Roméo Dallaire (Ret):

Roméo Dallaire is a Canadian Senator, author and humanitarian. During his highly decorated 35-year career in the Canadian Armed Forces, Dallaire served as the Force Commander of the United Nations Assistance Mission to Rwanda and bore witness to the 1994 genocide in that nation—one of the worst atrocities of the 20th century. Dallaire’s courage in calling to account the nations that abandoned Rwanda has made him a hero in Canada and around the world. With the publication of his most recent book They Fight Like Soldiers, They Die Like Children, Dallaire has turned his humanitarian concerns to another global tragedy, making it his personal mission to end the international use of child soldiers in war and armed conflict.

The Watts Lectures:

The Watts Lecture series is named in honour of the late F.B. Watts, a distinguished geography professor who died in 1969. The F. B. Watts Memorial Lecture series was established in  1970 with the intention that the lectures have as wide an appeal as possible both within the university and in the community, and that distinguished speakers be invited from all walks of life.




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