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UTSC announces design for major new artwork on campus

The University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC) is proud to announce artists Daniel Young and Christian Giroux have been selected to produce an original public art work for the atrium of the new Instructional Centre on campus.Constructed of powder-coated steel tubing, Young and Giroux’s winning proposal presents a series of lines forming planes and volumes in an abstract composition that celebrate UTSC’s architectural history. Their proposal nods to UTSC architect John Andrews and his prevalent Neo-Futurist vision for the university’s campus in the stacking quadrilateral forms that comprise the Humanities Wing. Young and Giroux were selected from an initial 92 submissions—the outcome of an international call for expressions of interest. In adherence with the University of Toronto’s Procurement procedures, the Selection Committee assigned three artist teams to a shortlist, from which emerged this winning team.Young and Giroux’s proposal was singled out by a selection committee composed of artists, critics, curators, faculty, and administrators, who agreed that it presented a vision of the new Instructional Centre that is in keeping with UTSC’s growth and movement into the new millennium. Jurors were most impressed by Young and Giroux’s consideration of the UTSC campus as a whole, their rigorous engagement with current themes in contemporary art and architecture, and their compelling sculptural solution to the unique properties of the space. Daniel Young and Christian Giroux have been making art together since 2002. They produce sculpture, public art and film installations. Their work is the product of an ongoing conversation concerning the modernity of the mid-century, the production of space and the built environment. Their work has been shown at Scope Miami Beach (2004); Ace Art Inc (Winnipeg, 2004); the Power Plant (Toronto, 2006); the EXiS festival (Seoul, 2009); and the Museum Fur Kunst und Gewerbe Hamburg (2009). They are represented by Diaz Contemporary in Toronto.




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